Arthur Middleton and Joe Riis, Nominated for National Geographics "Adventurers of the Year"

VIDEO - Winners of the Camp Monaco Prize for Yellowstone Biodiversity Research and Public Education, Arthur Middleton and Joe Riis, Nominated for National Geo Graphics "Adventurers of the Year".

  Nov 13, 2015   btugwell


Winners of the Camp Monaco Prize for Yellowstone Biodiversity Research and Public Education, Arthur Middleton and Joe Riis, Nominated for National Geo Graphics "Adventurers of the Year".

From National Geographic's "Adventurers of the Year 2016"
Nomination Page:

Read the complete story and vote for Arthur and Joe here.

"In the summer, the elk of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem migrate as far as 100 miles from the surrounding valleys, over 11,000-foot mountain passes, to the safety of Yellowstone National Park’s lush meadows and high plateaus. Beneath the gaze of millions of tourists, the creatures have become an icon for the National Park System, but what most visitors don’t realize is they are seeing only a small snapshot of their existence. While much of the elk’s summer habitat exists inside of federally protected land like Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, the wintering grounds in the valleys of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho exist on a complicated patchwork of state, federal, and private land where changing management practices and human barriers like fences and roads can strongly affect the fate of these herds.

“Some of the coolest wildlife migrations in the world are happening right in the middle of the United States,” says wildlife photojournalist Joe Riis, who has been photographing wildlife migrations in the region for the last eight years. “People just don't know about them because they don't see them.”

Two years ago, Riis and wildlife ecologist Arthur Middleton set out to change that with an unconventional, cross-discipline project to map and document the Greater Yellowstone elk migrations. It would require brains, creativity, and traversing stretches of some of the most rugged mountains in the lower 48. Middleton and Riis planned for the project to generate scientific journal articles , world-class photography, a short film, and a touring museum exhibition, “Invisible Boundaries.” They hope it would reach the hearts and minds of not only the people who call the northwestern corner of Wyoming home, but Americans at large. Having received the support of three National Geographic Expedition Council grants, the story will appear in the May 2015 edition of National Geographic magazine, which will be wholly focused on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem."